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There is a bad inheritance for concept 17552000|Dental calculus (disorder)|. It is due to the "associated morphology = calculus (morphologic abnormality" being in a separate hierarchy from the parent's "associated morphology = accretion (morphologic abnormality)". I was trying to fix this and wondered if "calculus" is really the correct morphologic abnormality to be using in the dental context. It seems to be a hardening of the plaque deposit and that maybe it would be better to add a new morphologic abnormality of "hardened plaque accretion" (FSN would need refinement) that would inherit under 10122001|Accretion (morphologic abnormality)|. If there is time perhaps this could be an agenda item.

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  1. Hi Penni,

     

    Hopefully this will be discussed as an agenda item, but I thought I would post a response as well.  I believe that Dental calculus (disorder) should have the associated morphology of Calculus (morphologic abnormality).

    In medicine, calculus means the precipitation of minerals which then aggregate. Dental plaque composes of cells, proteins, sugars and fats which provide a structure for the calcification process and the build-up of minerals. So it fits the definition of calculus. I feel this defines the concept better than the Accretion (morphologic abnormality) value.

    This paper defines dental calulus quite well: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9395117.

     

    Best wishes, Sarah